Patron Saint Troparion
Saint John Orthodox Church

The memory of the righteous is celebrated with songs of praise, but the Lord's testimony is sufficient for thee, O Forerunner. Thou wast shown indeed to be the most honorable of the prophets, for in the waters thou didst baptize him who had been proclaimed. After suffering in behalf of the truth, thou didst proclaim even to those in Hades the God who appeared in the flesh, who takes away the sin of the world and grants us the Great Mercy.


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Welcome to the official website of St. John Orthodox Church of Levittown NY. We intend to make it an educational tool to all who seek to use it. This website can be used for information on our church. We are located on a spacious private property with our own parking lot on 80 Water Lane North in Levittown, NY. Our Sunday Divine Liturgy begins at 10:30 AM. All are welcome.

- Pastor


Church Icons


St John Church

ICONS: THEOLOGY IN LINES AND COLORS

One of the first things that strikes a non-Orthodox visitor to an Orthodox church is the prominent place assigned to Holy Icons. The Iconostasis is covered with them, while others are placed in prominent places throughout the church building. The walls and ceiling are covered with icons. The Orthodox faithful prostrate themselves before icons, kiss them, and burn candles before them. They are censed by the clergy and carried in processions. Considering the obvious importance of the Holy Icons, then, questions may certainly be raised concerning them: What do these gestures and actions mean? What is the significance of Icons? Are they not idols or the like, prohibited by the Old Testament?

Icons have been used for prayer from the first centuries of Christianity. Sacred Tradition tells us, for example, of the existence of an Icon of the Savior during His lifetime (the “Icon-Made-Without-Hands”) and of Icons of the Most Holy Theotokos immediately after Him. Sacred Tradition witnesses that the Orthodox Church had a clear understanding of the importance of Icons right from the beginning; and this understanding never changed, for it is derived from the teachings concerning the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Holy Trinity—Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. The use of Icons is grounded in the very essence of Christianity, since Christianity is the revelation by God-Man not only of the Word of God, but also of the Image of God; for, as St. John the Evangelist tells us, “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14).

“No one has ever seen God; the Only-Begotten Son, Who is in the bosom of the Father, He has made Him known” (John 1:18), the Evangelist proclaims. That is, He has revealed the Image or Icon of God. For being the brightness of [God's] glory, and the express image of [God's] person (Hebrews 1:3), the Word of God in the Incarnation revealed to the world, in His own Divinity, the Image of the Father. When St. Philip asked Jesus, “Lord, show us the Father,”He answered him: “Have I been with you so long, and yet you do not know Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father” (John 14:8-9). Thus as the Son is in the bosom of the Father, likewise after the Incarnation He is Consubstantial with the Father, according to His divinity being the Father's Image, equal to Him in honor.

The Image (or Icon) not only does not contradict the essence of Christianity, but is unfailingly connected with it; and this is the foundation of the tradition that from the very beginning the Good News was brought to the world by the Church both in word and image. St. John of Damascus, an eighth-century Father of the Church, who wrote at the height of the iconoclastic (anti-icon) controversies in the Church, explains that, because the Word of God became flesh (John 1:14), we are no longer in our infancy; we have grown up, we have been given by God the power of discrimination and we know what can be depicted and what is indescribable. Since the Second Person of the Holy Trinity appeared to us in the flesh, we can portray Him and reproduce for contemplation of Him Who has condescended to be seen. We can confidently represent God the Invisible—not as an invisible being, but as one Who has made Himself visible for our sake by sharing in our flesh and blood.

Holy Icons developed side by side with the Divine Services and, like the Services, expressed the teaching of the Church in conformity with the word of Holy Scripture. Following the teaching of the Seventh Ecumenical Council, the Icon is seen not as simple art, but that there is a complete correspondence of the Icon to Holy Scripture, “for if the Icon is shown by Holy Scripture, Holy Scripture is made incontestably clear by the Icon” (Acts of the 7th Ecumenical Council, 6). As the word of Holy Scripture is an image, so the image is also a word, for, according to St. Basil the Great (379 AD): “By depicting the divine, we are not making ourselves similar to idolaters; for it is not the material symbol that we are worshipping, but the Creator, Who became corporeal for our sake and assumed our body in order that through it He might save mankind. We also venerate the material objects through which our salvation is made real: The blessed wood of the Cross, the Holy Gospel, Holy Relics of Saints, and, above all, the Most-Pure Body and Blood of Christ, which have grace-bestowing properties and Divine Power.”

Orthodox Christians do not venerate an Icon of Christ because of the nature of the wood or the paint, but rather we venerate the inanimate image of Christ with the intention of worshipping Christ Himself as God Incarnate through it. We kiss an Icon of the Blessed Virgin as the Mother of the Son of God, just as we kiss the Icons of the Saints as God's friends who struggled against sin, imitating Christ by shedding their blood for Him and following in His footsteps. Saints are venerated as those who were glorified by God and who became, with God's help, terrible to the Enemy, and benefactors to those advancing in the faith—but not as gods and benefactors themselves. They were the servants of God who were given boldness of spirit in return for their love of Him. We gaze on the depiction of their exploits and sufferings so as to sanctify ourselves through them and to spur ourselves on to zealous emulation.

The Icons of the Saints act as a meeting point between the living members of the (Militant) Church on earth and the Saints who have passed on to the (Triumphant) Church in Heaven. The Saints depicted in Icons are not remote, legendary figures from the past, but contemporary, personal friends. As meeting points between Heaven and earth, the Icons of Christ, His Mother, the Angels and Saints constantly remind the faithful of the invisible presence of the whole company of Heaven; they visibly express the idea of Heaven on earth.

The Iconostasis

The most prominent feature of an Orthodox church is the Iconostasis, consisting of one or more rows of Icons and broken by a set of doors in the center (the Holy or Royal Doors) and a door at each side (the Deacon’s Doors). A typical Iconostasis consists of one or more tiers (rows) of Icons. At the center of the first, or lowest, tier, are the Royal Doors, on which are placed Icons of the four Evangelists who announced to the world Good News—the Gospel—of the Savior. At the center of the Royal Doors is an Icon of the Annunciation to the Most Holy Theotokos (the Mother of God), since this event was the prelude or beginning of our salvation. Over the Royal Doors is placed an Icon of the Mystical Supper (the Last Supper) since, in the Altar beyond, the Mystery of the Holy Eucharist is celebrated in remembrance of the Savior Who instituted the Sacrament at the Last Supper.

At either side of the Royal Doors are always placed an Icon of the Savior (to the right) and of the Most Holy Theotokos (to the left). On either side of the Royal Doors, beyond the Icons of the Lord and His Mother, are two doors—Deacon's Doors—upon which are depicted either saintly Deacons or Angels, who minister always at the heavenly Altar, just as do the earthly deacons during the Divine services. On the right side of the Savior, the Icon of the Glorious Prophet and Forerunner, John the Baptist, is placed. On the left side of the Theotokos, the Icon of the Patron Saint of the Church Temple is placed (in our Church, as St. John the Forerunner is our Patron Saint and already placed on the right side of the Savior, the Icon of the Annunciation is placed on the left side of the Theotokos).

On the Second Tier, above, the Icons of the Twelve Apostles are placed, and are centered above by an Icon of the Holy Cross. Other Icons of particular local significance are also placed in the first row of the Iconostasis, for which reason the lower tier is often called the Local Icons. Inside the Sanctuary/Altar area, and above the Mystical Supper Icon, there is always found the Icon of the Theotokos and Child, called “More Spacious than the Heavens.” It is an image of the Incarnation, and, of the Worship of the Faithful in the Church.
Icons are “written” and not “painted” as this is the correct Orthodox reference, because Icons are Theology, in Lines and Colors. All of the Icons in our Church Temple are written by the Iconographer Antoine Soulounias. Phone: (516) 504-5608

 

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